Trailer: For the Love of Books

For the Love of Books is my documentary film about Kathy Patrick’s Girlfriend Weekend.  I’ve entered the film in five festivals. If you don’t know Kathy, she’s the founder of the Pulpwood Queens Book Club, an organization which now has over 500 chapters worldwide. Each January, Kathy hosts a “Girlfriend Weekend” book party that brings over fifty authors and three hundred book club members to Jefferson, Texas. This film captures Girlfriend Weekend 2012.  I edited the film on Apple’s Final Cut Pro X and shot the video on a JVC GY-HM 150 U.

Please consider “liking” the post and sharing the link on Facebook. I think you’ll get a laugh out of Wade’s costume and from some very funny lines from talented Pulpwood Queen Authors. Thanks to Kathy Patrick for putting this event together!

Pulpwood Queen Girlfriend Weekend William Torgerson Kathy Patrick

At the Pretty in Pink Prom Party
Photo by Natalie Brasington

Podcast: Apple’s Final Cut Pro X: Making the Transition (podcast)

I first heard about Larry Jordan when I was taking a Pro Lab course at the Apple store on 14th Street in Manhattan.  Larry came up in conversation as a Final Cut Pro X guru several times. I think even the instructor of the course mentioned him.  Because I was working on a documentary film called For the Love of Books, I was trying to learn how to use the video editing software.

Larry Jordan William Torgerson For the Love of Books Apple Final Cut Pro X

Final Cut Pro X: Making the Transition

I bought Larry’s book Final Cut Pro: Making the Transition.  The word “transition” refers to all of those film editors who’d learned all the other editions of Apple’s Final Cut Pro.  I wasn’t transitioning; I was just getting started, but I found the book very helpful, especially when it came to color correction and work flows. I had a lot of trouble with freezes and crashes of Final Cut Pro X as I was trying to export my film.

In my conversation with Larry, we focus on his writing of the book.  You can listen to the podcast directly from this website, or you can download our discussion as an iTunes podcast from the Prof. Torg: Read, Write, and Teach Digital Book Club.

Click on the play button below to listen:

Take a Poll and Tell Me About You and Television?

I usually get to work before my colleague David Farley, and it’s become our habit that he stops at my office door and we talk about something related to writing, teaching, or family. This job we have teaching First Year Composition has carried me into digital writing, and David and I are often talking about digital texts in relation to the teaching of writing. I’m interested in the future of books, and I’m interested in how our internet habits will impact our reading, writing, and thinking. One day, David went over into his office and came back with Lawrence Lessig’s Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy. Wikipedia (I’m getting more obsessed with it) tells me that Lessig “is a director of the Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics at Harvard University and a professor of law at Harvard Law School.”

Lawrence Lessig’s Remix

Here’s something I wouldn’t mind hearing about from you in the comments section: Have your television watching habits changed? In this book, Lessig writes about Read Only (R.O.) and Read Write (R.W.) culture. Taking television as an example, I think it’s been R.O. By that, I mean you just sit there and watch it. You consume it. You don’t interact with it. Reading a Facebook post isn’t like that. Reading a Twitter feed isn’t like that. You get to Tweet back. You get to interact.

Television watching, from what I can see, is becoming more interactive. You can vote for your favorite American Idol. You can Tweet along with everyone else as they watch the NCAA basketball tournament. You can read what people say about President Obama and Presidential hopeful Romney on Facebook.  As I understand from Lessig, back when people went down to the town square to see entertainment, they were in a culture that tended toward R.W. They were entertained and had a chance to interact, to sing along, to talk with others, and to go home and try out the songs on their front porch.

With the rise of television and newspapers, R.W. went on the decline. People just consumed content with little or no chance to interact. Now with Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, and other social platforms such as blogs, R.W. is on the rise. People read Harry Potter and go see the movies and then they write on fan fiction sites. All of these features of consuming and interacting seem significant to the craft of teaching and what it will mean to get an education.

Let’s consider for a second the teacher’s lecture.  Possibly BORING!!!! and most times heavy on the R.O. side of consumption.   I’d like to be as R.W. as I can when it comes to my teaching pedagogy. Perhaps I’m using the term wrong but for now, I know what I mean.  :)

More on Lessig’s book and some Golden Lines in the coming posts. There’s a poll below for you and if you’d like to elaborate on your TV watching habits, I hope you’ll add them to the comments section.